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The Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) – for entrepreneurs only – is a dynamic, global network of more than 14,000 business owners in 61 countries.

Created For Entrepreneurs, Innovators and Disrupters

It’s been more than 25 years since a group of forward-thinking entrepreneurs created a network of like-minded peers to help each other learn and grow. EO’s evolution over that time has brought together some of the world’s most talented entrepreneurs, earning it the reputation as the world’s most influential community of entrepreneurs. 

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EO is proud to offer members the opportunity to learn at a higher, more intense level through executive education programming.

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The EO Accelerator program supports early-stage entrepreneurs who are driven to reach the $1million revenue mark.

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As a member of our EONJ you'll get to participate in incredible EONJ learning and social events.

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1st Annual EONJ Tennis Tournament

November 13 @ 6:30 pm - 11:30 pm

free

Tournament Sponsored by Glen Eagle and Withum
4321 is a fun, fast-paced doubles game with a number of twists, including team competition, rotating partners, and bonus scoring.

Players are organized into teams of 3 to 4 members, and over the course of the competition the teams compete for highest overall score.

Each round is a game to 100 points. Play starts with 2 players from each team facing each other doubles-style on the baseline. A pro running the court feeds the ball and the rally begins. Please note players do not serve the ball in 4321. Teams will be created with players of mixed ability levels (when you register please let us know your ability level from the list below). The object is to not only win the rally, but to do so in such a way as to maximize the point value of the win. Generally, the more aggressive you are, the more points a win is worth.

· A simple miss (hitting ball in the net or out of the doubles court) scores 1 point for the winner.

· Win the point on a volley is worth 2 points.

· Overhead winner = 3 points.

· Clean winner of any sort (opponent doesn’t touch the ball) is 4 points.

· Also a bonus of a 6 pointer will begiven for a volley clean winner.

· A bonus of 7 points will be given for an overhead winner.

· Additionally, bonus points are available. If the ball hits the net during a shot and you win, an additional point goes to the winner’s value.

After each rally, both sides rotate players so that everyone is involved.

Luckily, you don’t have to keep all this straight: Your pro will keep track of the score, you just concentrate on hitting the ball, encouraging your teammates and having fun.

Get ready to get your 4321 on!

General Characteristics of the Different Playing Levels

1.5

This player has limited experience and is still working primarily on getting the ball into play.

2.0

This player needs on-court experience. This player has obvious stroke weaknesses but is familiar with basic positions for singles and doubles play.

2.5

This player is learning to judge where the ball is going although court coverage is weak. Can sustain a short rally of slow pace with other players of the same ability.

3.0

This player is fairly consistent when hitting medium paced shots, but is not comfortable with all strokes and lacks execution when trying for directional control, depth, or power. Most common doubles formation is one-up, one-back.

3.5

This player has achieved improved stroke dependability with directional control on moderate shots, but still lacks depth and variety. This player exhibits more aggressive net play, has improved court coverage, and is developing teamwork in doubles.

4.0

This player has dependable strokes, including directional control and depth on both forehand and backhand sides on moderate shots, plus the ability to use lobs, overheads, approach shots and volleys with some success. This player occasionally forces errors when serving. Rallies may be lost due to impatience. Teamwork in doubles is evident.

4.5

This player has begun to master the use of power and spins and is beginning to handle pace, has sound footwork, can control depth of shots, and is beginning to vary game plan according to opponents. This player can hit first serves with power and accuracy and place the second serve. This player tends to over hit on difficult shots. Aggressive net play is common in doubles.

5.0

This player has good shot anticipation and frequently has an outstanding shot or attribute around which a game may be structured. This player can regularly hit winners or force errors off of short balls and can put away volleys, can successfully execute lobs, drop shots, half volleys, overhead smashes, and has good depth and spin on most 2nd serves.

5.5

This player has developed power and/or consistency as a major weapon. This player can vary strategies and styles of play in a competitive situation and hits dependable shots in a stress situation.

6.0 to 7.0

The 6.0-player typically has had intensive training for national tournament competition at the junior and collegiate levels and has obtained a sectional and/or national ranking. The 7.0-player is a world class player.

Tournament Sponsored by Glen Eagle and Withum

4321 is a fun, fast-paced doubles game with a number of twists, including team competition, rotating partners, and bonus scoring.

Players are organized into teams of 3 to 4 members, and over the course of the competition the teams compete for highest overall score.

Each round is a game to 100 points. Play starts with 2 players from each team facing each other doubles-style on the baseline. A pro running the court feeds the ball and the rally begins. Please note players do not serve the ball in 4321. Teams will be created with players of mixed ability levels (when you register please let us know your ability level from the list below). The object is to not only win the rally, but to do so in such a way as to maximize the point value of the win. Generally, the more aggressive you are, the more points a win is worth.

· A simple miss (hitting ball in the net or out of the doubles court) scores 1 point for the winner.

· Win the point on a volley is worth 2 points.

· Overhead winner = 3 points.

· Clean winner of any sort (opponent doesn’t touch the ball) is 4 points.

· Also a bonus of a 6 pointer will begiven for a volley clean winner.

· A bonus of 7 points will be given for an overhead winner.

· Additionally, bonus points are available. If the ball hits the net during a shot and you win, an additional point goes to the winner’s value.

After each rally, both sides rotate players so that everyone is involved.

Luckily, you don’t have to keep all this straight: Your pro will keep track of the score, you just concentrate on hitting the ball, encouraging your teammates and having fun.

Get ready to get your 4321 on!

General Characteristics of the Different Playing Levels

1.5

This player has limited experience and is still working primarily on getting the ball into play.

2.0

This player needs on-court experience. This player has obvious stroke weaknesses but is familiar with basic positions for singles and doubles play.

2.5

This player is learning to judge where the ball is going although court coverage is weak. Can sustain a short rally of slow pace with other players of the same ability.

3.0

This player is fairly consistent when hitting medium paced shots, but is not comfortable with all strokes and lacks execution when trying for directional control, depth, or power. Most common doubles formation is one-up, one-back.

3.5

This player has achieved improved stroke dependability with directional control on moderate shots, but still lacks depth and variety. This player exhibits more aggressive net play, has improved court coverage, and is developing teamwork in doubles.

4.0

This player has dependable strokes, including directional control and depth on both forehand and backhand sides on moderate shots, plus the ability to use lobs, overheads, approach shots and volleys with some success. This player occasionally forces errors when serving. Rallies may be lost due to impatience. Teamwork in doubles is evident.

4.5

This player has begun to master the use of power and spins and is beginning to handle pace, has sound footwork, can control depth of shots, and is beginning to vary game plan according to opponents. This player can hit first serves with power and accuracy and place the second serve. This player tends to over hit on difficult shots. Aggressive net play is common in doubles.

5.0

This player has good shot anticipation and frequently has an outstanding shot or attribute around which a game may be structured. This player can regularly hit winners or force errors off of short balls and can put away volleys, can successfully execute lobs, drop shots, half volleys, overhead smashes, and has good depth and spin on most 2nd serves.

5.5

This player has developed power and/or consistency as a major weapon. This player can vary strategies and styles of play in a competitive situation and hits dependable shots in a stress situation.

6.0 to 7.0

The 6.0-player typically has had intensive training for national tournament competition at the junior and collegiate levels and has obtained a sectional and/or national ranking. The 7.0-player is a world class player.

Tournament Sponsored by Glen Eagle and Withum

4321 is a fun, fast-paced doubles game with a number of twists, including team competition, rotating partners, and bonus scoring.

Players are organized into teams of 3 to 4 members, and over the course of the competition the teams compete for highest overall score.

Each round is a game to 100 points. Play starts with 2 players from each team facing each other doubles-style on the baseline. A pro running the court feeds the ball and the rally begins. Please note players do not serve the ball in 4321. Teams will be created with players of mixed ability levels (when you register please let us know your ability level from the list below). The object is to not only win the rally, but to do so in such a way as to maximize the point value of the win. Generally, the more aggressive you are, the more points a win is worth.

· A simple miss (hitting ball in the net or out of the doubles court) scores 1 point for the winner.

· Win the point on a volley is worth 2 points.

· Overhead winner = 3 points.

· Clean winner of any sort (opponent doesn’t touch the ball) is 4 points.

· Also a bonus of a 6 pointer will begiven for a volley clean winner.

· A bonus of 7 points will be given for an overhead winner.

· Additionally, bonus points are available. If the ball hits the net during a shot and you win, an additional point goes to the winner’s value.

After each rally, both sides rotate players so that everyone is involved.

Luckily, you don’t have to keep all this straight: Your pro will keep track of the score, you just concentrate on hitting the ball, encouraging your teammates and having fun.

Get ready to get your 4321 on!

General Characteristics of the Different Playing Levels

1.5

This player has limited experience and is still working primarily on getting the ball into play.

2.0

This player needs on-court experience. This player has obvious stroke weaknesses but is familiar with basic positions for singles and doubles play.

2.5

This player is learning to judge where the ball is going although court coverage is weak. Can sustain a short rally of slow pace with other players of the same ability.

3.0

This player is fairly consistent when hitting medium paced shots, but is not comfortable with all strokes and lacks execution when trying for directional control, depth, or power. Most common doubles formation is one-up, one-back.

3.5

This player has achieved improved stroke dependability with directional control on moderate shots, but still lacks depth and variety. This player exhibits more aggressive net play, has improved court coverage, and is developing teamwork in doubles.

4.0

This player has dependable strokes, including directional control and depth on both forehand and backhand sides on moderate shots, plus the ability to use lobs, overheads, approach shots and volleys with some success. This player occasionally forces errors when serving. Rallies may be lost due to impatience. Teamwork in doubles is evident.

4.5

This player has begun to master the use of power and spins and is beginning to handle pace, has sound footwork, can control depth of shots, and is beginning to vary game plan according to opponents. This player can hit first serves with power and accuracy and place the second serve. This player tends to over hit on difficult shots. Aggressive net play is common in doubles.

5.0

This player has good shot anticipation and frequently has an outstanding shot or attribute around which a game may be structured. This player can regularly hit winners or force errors off of short balls and can put away volleys, can successfully execute lobs, drop shots, half volleys, overhead smashes, and has good depth and spin on most 2nd serves.

5.5

This player has developed power and/or consistency as a major weapon. This player can vary strategies and styles of play in a competitive situation and hits dependable shots in a stress situation.

6.0 to 7.0

The 6.0-player typically has had intensive training for national tournament competition at the junior and collegiate levels and has obtained a sectional and/or national ranking. The 7.0-player is a world class player.

Details

Date:
November 13
Time:
6:30 pm - 11:30 pm
Cost:
free
Event Category:
Register »

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